Stage Coach Travel to Clinton in 1826

Today our travel mode mainly is by the privately owned car or truck. We take for granted paved roads with safety stripes, shoulders, good maintenance and periodic resurfacing. Back in 1826 things differed for all travelers as the roads weren’t more than wagon trails barely sufficient for an ox team.

Continue reading

1850s in Clinton

Can anyone take a look backwards to 1852 and visualize what Clinton looked like, what buildings and homes were standing, what business ventures prospered or failed, or what citizens did for fun and entertainment in the middle of the 19th century? Let’s turn the clock back now to the less

Continue reading

Kirkland Cemeteries – Kellogg/Chuckery Cemetery

Almost to Chuckery on the north side of Kellogg Street is the next abandoned cemetery in our series: the Kellogg/Chuckery Cemetery. Early settlers in that eastern area of the town were buried there from such local families as Comstock, Kellogg, and Marshall. The Kirkland Highway Department takes good care of

Continue reading

Genealogy Tips

Ask them about where their parents, or grandparents are buried. Ask if any of your relatives have previously done any genealogy research. Find out who are your oldest living relatives, visit them and record your conversation with them. Send for copies of birth certificates on individuals. Send for copies of

Continue reading

Black History Post Civil War

Slaves Rescued in Utica Prior to the Civil War fugitive slave laws sought to capture runaway slaves from the south and return them to their owners. The famous “Jerry” rescue in Syracuse occurred in 1851, but Utica had a similar rescue in December 1836. “When two Negro men were claimed

Continue reading

Stone Churches

While much attention lately has been directed at the clock and bell in the Stone Presbyterian Church tower, at right is a picture of the Stone Church which served Clinton residents between 1836 and 1876 when it burned. It actually was sited about 20 feet east of the current church,

Continue reading

Grover’s Indiscretion

A familiar refrain of Republicans during the 1884 presidential campaign was: “Ma, Ma, where’s my Pa? Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha” The Village of Clinton had a brief attachment with Grover Cleveland who was caught in a paternity situation that almost ruined his political career. Cleveland spent

Continue reading